Global Political Economy Alumni

  • Dr Frederick Harry Pitts

    Global Political Economy Alumni


    University of Bath, Department of Social and Policy Sciences

    Start date:

    Research topic: Marxian Value Theory and the Crisis of Measurability: A Case Study of Work in the Creative Industries in the UK and the Netherlands

    Email: fh.pitts@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fhpitts

    Website/Blog: http://frederickharrypitts.com/


  • Dr Steven Rolf

    Global Political Economy Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2012

    Research topic: Uneven and combined development and the production of 'spaces of production': Electronics global production networks in the Dongguan-Hong Kong nexus

    Research supervisors: Professor Jeffrey Henderson (Bristol), Dr Adam Dixon (Bristol)

    Email: Steve.Rolf@bristol.ac.uk


  • Kate Burrell

    Global Political Economy Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bath, Department of Social & Policy Sciences

    Start date: September 2012

    Research topic: How do movements bring about social transformation? Social movements and pre-figurative politics in the globalised world

    Research supervisors: Dr Ana Dinerstein (Bath), Dr Naomi Milner (Bristol)

    Email: kb257@bath.ac.uk


  • Richard Baxter

    Global Political Economy Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bath, Department of Economics

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Assessing cultural ecosystem services: helping to answer the call of TEEB (2010) that there has been little progress to-date

    This research builds on current work in the area of cultural ecosystem services.  According to TEEB (2010), there has been “little progress” in their mapping to-date.  Seven types of cultural ecosystem service are included in the research (such as aesthetic, cultural heritage and recreation).  Innovative triangulation techniques are used to produce results which aim to lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the natural benefits and costs derived from cultural ecosystem services.

    Research supervisors: Dr Alistair Hunt

    Email: rb863@bath.ac.uk


  • Molly Bond

    Global Political Economy Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School for Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: Governing the Bioeconomy

    Bridging Science and Technology Studies (STS), Development Studies and Poltical Ecology, and contextually set within the emerging policy transition to a global ‘Bioeconomy’, my research examines the implications of commercial synthetic biology to sustainable development and future agro-industrial production. I am particularly interested in the concepts of ‘disruptive’, ‘sustainable’ and ‘responsible’ innovation, as well as how these notions are assimilated into multi-stakeholder deliberations and the global governance of emerging technologies at the UN Convention of Biological Diversity.

    Research supervisors: Dr Maria Fannin (Bristol), Dr Karen Tucker (Bristol), Professor Clare Saunders (Exeter)

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Cabot Institute FSSL International Development Research Group Global Political Economy Research Group Development Studies Association

    Email: molly.bond@bristol.ac.uk

    Website/Blog: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/geography/people/molly-rose-r-bond/overview.html


  • Dr Lydia Medland

    Global Political Economy Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS)

    Start date: September 2013

    Research topic: Global Political Economy of Food and Seasonal Production (Case study, Morocco)

    My research is focused on seasonal workers and their experiences of global food production, specifically in Morocco. I am researching the social and working conditions of seasonal workers and their livelihood strategies whilst producing crops such as tomatoes in counter-seasonal rhythms destined for Europe. In the context of changing social and political conditions in Europe and Northern Africa I am interested to understand how the political economy of food is interpreted in local contexts, particularly by workers. Methodologically, my approach is interpretive and will involve in-depth interviews and visual methods. For this research I am learning French and Moroccan Arabic.

    Research supervisors: Professor Tonia Novitz (Bristol), Dr Emma Carmel (Bath), Dr Adrian Flint (Bristol)

    Professional memberships/Positions held:   Co-coordinator of Bristol Participatory Action Research Group SPAIS Student Rep

    Email: Lydia.Medland@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/Lydyact