Human Geography Alumni


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  • Dr Tim Walker

    Human Geography Alumni


    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Graduation date: 2016

    Research topic: Geographies of Risk, Uncertainty and Ambiguity in Catchment Management

    Current position: Since graduation my research work has expanded, beyond just environmental stuff, to include geographies of volunteering and well-being. I am a Research Fellow at the Centre for Geography, Environment and Society; University of Exeter; working on the ERDF funded Smartline project: www.smartline.org.uk

    Email: t.w.walker@exeter.ac.uk

    Website/Blog: http://geography.exeter.ac.uk/staff/index.php?web_id=Timothy_Walker&tab=profile


  • Dr Suzanne Hocknell

    Human Geography Alumni


    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Graduation date: 2017

    Research topic: Fat Chance? Eating well with margarine (Available: https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/handle/10871/27794)

    Current position: Research Associate in Geography at Newcastle University on an ESRC funded project ‘Corporate food retailers, meat supply chains and the responsibilities of tackling antimicrobial resistance’ with Prof. Alex Hughes (PI), Dr Emma Roe, Prof. Neil Wrigley, Prof. Michelle Lowe and Prof. Bill Keevil (Co-Is).

    Email: suzanne.hocknell@ncl.ac.uk

    Website/Blog: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/gps/staff/profile/suzannehocknellnclacuk.html#background


  • Dr Anna Jackman

    Human Geography Alumni


    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Graduation date: 2017

    Research topic: Unmanned geographies: Drone visions and visions of the drone

    Current position: My new job is as a Lecturer in Political Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London

    Email: Anna.Jackman@rhul.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ahjackman

    Website/Blog: https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/anna-jackman(18951d4e-7744-479e-90d7-f9bf11532373).html


  • Amy Hornsby

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2018

    Research topic: Carceral Companions: deconstructing masculinity and criminality through companion animal relationships in the dwelt world

    I am interested in ‘more-than-human’ research methods in human geography and unpacking the everyday through an affective politics as a form of meaning-making. I am currently studying Society and Space MSc to gain new insights into methodologies and theory before beginning my PhD research. My research shall look at dog training programmes in prisons and why they are so effectively transformative: decreasing reoffending rates dramatically. I shall investigate the genealogy of constituting both the incarcerated human and non-human. Such research will aid the interdisciplinary need to reconfigure hegemonic understandings and materialities of criminality, gender and the more-than-human affective lived experience.

    Research supervisors: Dr Franklin Ginn, Dr Julie MacLeavy

    Email: ah15756@my.bristol.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amy-hornsby-498106132/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmyHornsby5


  • Dominic Ader

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC +3)
    School of Geographical Science, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: A Deleuzian account of illness experience: habit, memory and open futures

    Research supervisors: Dr John David Drewsbury, Dr Maria Fannin

    Email: da15354@bristol.ac.uk


  • Dr Freya Johnson

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC +3)
    School of Geographical Science, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2015

    Graduation date: May 2020

    Research topic: The rising levels of personal debt within Britain

    Research supervisors: Dr Julie MacLeavy (Peoples)

    Email: fj14575@my.bristol.ac.uk


  • Dr Adam Flitton

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Start date: September 2014

    Graduation date: August 2019

    Research topic: The evolution of cooperation

    Email: af395@exeter.ac.uk


  • Dr Ciara Merrick

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    School of Geographical Science, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2014

    Graduation date: January 2020

    Research topic: Breathing Shared Worlds: Northern Ireland, Territory and Peace

    My PhD project is concerned with everyday peace building in post-conflict Belfast, Northern Ireland. By tracing the flow, movement and silences of breath, I seek to explore the spatial and embodied materialities that shape how the self, the other, and community relationships are both imagined and created. To move with encounters happening in-between a sharing of breath, is to advance an alternative politics of sharing, which finds its origin within difference rather than sameness.

    Research supervisors: Dr Mark Jackson, Dr Maria Fannin

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Member of the Royal Geographic Society MSc Society and Space Mentor

    Email: cm14280@my.bristol.ac.uk


  • Dr Paula Crutchlow

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Start date: September 2013

    Graduation date: July 2019

    Research topic: The Museum of Contemporary Commodities - arts and social science towards the trade-justice knowledge action gap

    Research supervisors: Professor Ian Cook

    Email: pc343@exeter.ac.uk


  • Dr Callum Sutherland

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC +3)
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

    Start date: September 2012

    Research topic: Theography, identity, and space in postsecular politics.

    Research supervisors: Professor Paul Cloke

    Email: cws202@exeter.ac.uk


  • Dr Alistair Anderson

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Antimicrobial Resistance

    My PhD research focuses on the multispecies nature of the problem of antimicrobial resistance. My research explores pet owners’ beliefs about and use of antibiotics using a mixed-methods approach, with secondary analysis and a quantitative survey project complemented by qualitative approaches. I am also interested in the the methodology of survey research and how this affects opinion and attitude research in the context of antibiotic stewardship.

    Research supervisors: Dr Maria Fannin, Professor Richard Harris, Dr Levi Wolf

    Professional memberships/Positions held: School of Geographical Sciences – Teaching Support Assistant Social Research Association – Member

    Email: aa12938@bristol.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/alistair-anderson-4a64b214b

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/AAnder94

    Website/Blog: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/geography/people/alistair-e-anderson/index.html


  • Catherine Midwood

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Temporary Urban Interventions: A Bodily and Sensory Approach

    This project explores temporary interventions in urban spaces with a focus on ephemeral bodily and sensory intensities, as understood through an affective and non-representational approach. I have three case studies to explore over the next couple of years. They are: an institutional endeavour to intervene with playful technological experiments (Bristol’s Playable City), my own participatory interventions (chalk art drawing events), and a more short-lived, ineffable experiment which will emphasise sensory encounters. This research will contribute to the growing field of literature on temporary interventions, geographical work on the body, sensuous geographies, and discussions about the use of creative methods in geography

     

    Research supervisors: Dr JD Dewsbury, Dr Merle Patchett

    Email: catherine.midwood@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/cjmidwood


  • Dr Sarah Tupper

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    Geography, University of Exeter

    Start date: September 2013

    Graduation date: July 2018

    Research topic: Entwined becomings: older people’s experience of post-disaster recovery

    I am a poststructuralist geographer interested in how subject experiences and responses can resonate through different practices and performances. My research has involved undertaking qualitative data collection (narrative interviews and participant observation) in Christchurch, New Zealand where the region has experienced multiple earthquakes. I am focusing particularly on how those of older generation make sense of, cope and persist in the face of continuing adversity. I am interested in the types of practices which emerge and how this contributes to understandings of subjects and places as continuously becoming.

    Research supervisors: Professor Paul Cloke, Dr Jennifer Lea

    Email: st431@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/sarah-tupper-91b93b69

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/tupper_sarah


  • George Burdon

    Human Geography Alumni

    MSc Society & Space (ESRC 1+3)
    Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Music as the flow of matter: re-evaluating cultural formations

    I am currently on the first year of an ESRC 1+3 pathway, so at the present I am studying for an MSc in Society & Space before moving onto PhD research next year. My research interests centre around theorizing music (and sound more generally) as flowing matter; as a vibrational force that unhinges potential reactions, actions and movements in the ephemerality of the moment of its encounter. Through the deployment of contemporary theories of affect and materiality, I hope to examine music as a force that moulds bodies and spaces, providing singular experiences for the listening body that are forever beyond the limits of representation, which in turn has profound resonances for how we think of subjectivity.

    Research supervisors: Dr J D Dewsbury

    Email: georgeburdon.2011@my.bristol.ac.uk


  • Dr Stephanie Denning

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Start date: September 2013

    Graduation date: February 2019

    Research topic: Faith, Volunteering and Holiday Hunger: Questioning Action and Persistence through Affect Theory

    UK food poverty has reached unprecedented levels, and faith groups are playing a crucial role in responding to it.  How are people motivated by their faith to respond to food poverty, and how do they persist in volunteering?  This is important to understand if projects relying upon volunteers are to be sustainable.  I explore volunteers’ motivations and persistence in action through affective geographies within non-representational theories.  From Spinoza, an affect operates between bodies and is about the power of a body to act, whilst an affection is about the state of a body and the impact of an affect upon a body.  This research’s focus on faith-based social action contributes to two key themes in the geography of religion: understanding faith as performed in people’s lives, and questioning the role of faith in society.  Using action research and participatory methodologies, over twenty months I established and ran a MakeLunch project in a church.  MakeLunch is a national Christian charity whose projects respond to children’s holiday hunger by providing free lunches.  It is through my own and volunteers’ narratives that I explore how faith motivates action, and how we persisted in volunteering.

    I conclude that volunteers’ faith was significant in motivating volunteering, but motivations must be continually re-ignited to avoid in-action.  Three contributions follow.  First, through affect theory, research can go beyond understanding faith as a social construct by highlighting how by virtue of their faith, volunteering can hold more meaning than what is represented in action.  Secondly, from the conceptual emphasis on affection, nuances of reflecting can be discerned and the role of will challenged because volunteers are changed by affections, which in turn affects their future actions.  Thirdly, the combination of affect and affection portrays how there is a continual cycle of motivation, action and reflection in volunteers’ persistence.

    Current position: In your own words and in first person: I am currently a Research Fellow at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University on a three year ESRC funded project ‘Life on the Breadline’ – https://breadlineresearch.coventry.ac.uk – researching Christian responses to UK poverty in the context of austerity.

    Research supervisors: Dr J D Dewsbury, Paul Cloke (Exeter)

    Professional memberships/Positions held:

    Royal Geographical Society with IBG Postgraduate Fellow

    Member of SWDTC Participatory Action Research Group

     

    Email: stephanie.denning@coventry.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanie-denning-0a883666/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/SJ_Denning

    Website/Blog: https://pureportal.coventry.ac.uk/en/persons/stephanie-denning


  • Dr Emma Marshall

    Human Geography Alumni

    PhD Researcher in Human Geography (ESRC 1+3)
    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Geography, University of Exeter

    Start date: September 2014

    Graduation date: February 2021

    Research topic: Class and the asylum determination system in the UK

    My research examines the extent to which the concept of class can provide a theoretical framework to interpret how the individual backgrounds of asylum seekers, such as their education or occupation in their country of origin, may account for discrepancies in procedural outcomes. It is well documented that in the UK some asylum seekers get much quicker and more accurate initial decisions than others, for reasons that go beyond whether they are making a genuine claim. I am interested in exploring how class identity is constructed through perceptions of social value, and how these values may influence the decision-making process.

    Research supervisors: Dr Nick Gill, Dr Naomi Millner

    Email: egm203@exeter.ac.uk