Advanced Quantitative Methods

  • Alex Kwong

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences/Centre for Multilevel Modelling

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Genetic and environmental contributions to psychiatric disorders

    Both genes and the environment contribute to psychiatric disorders, however the extent to which they both contribute and interact to cause illness is still poorly understood. Modelling longitudinal data is one way to explore this relationship. My research uses data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and statistical techniques such as multilevel modelling (MLM) to address this topic.

    Research supervisors: Dr David Manley, Dr Nic Timpson, Dr George Leckie, Dr Evie Stergiakouli

    Email: alex.kwong@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/asfkwong

    Website/Blog: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/geography/people/alex-s-kwong/index.html


  • Amy Sweet

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: The impact of segregation on children and young people over time

    Research supervisors: Professor Richard Harris, Dr David Manley

    Email: amy.sweet@bristol.ac.uk


  • Beatriz Gallo Cordoba

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, Graduate School of Education

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Ethnic Segregation and Academic Attainment in Colombia

    My research concerns the link between ethnicity and pupils’ attainment. In particular, the research employs multilevel modelling to understand the link between ethnic segregation and ethnic attainment gaps at the end of compulsory education in Colombia.

    Research supervisors: Dr George Leckie, Dr William J Browne

    Email: beatriz.gallocordoba@bristol.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/beatriz-gallo-córdoba-334b4236


  • Chengxi Hu

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Prediction of population ageing trends and potential risks in China's cities

    China is on the brink of a transformation to an ageing society. Population ageing also constitutes multifaceted challenges and potential risks to Chinese society. My research attempts to provide a broad macro perspective on the population ageing process and trends and forecast the future impact of these demographic changes in China’s cities. Based on the panel data of 660 cities in China and some specially selected demographic and socioeconomic variables, a prediction model shall be developed to predict ageing trends and potential risks across different cities in China. A region-level policy analysis shall also be explored.

    Research supervisors: Dr Winnie Wang, Dr Junko Yamashita

    Email: ch16399@bristol.ac.uk


  • Elizabeth Bermeo

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: Determinants of financial inclusion

    My research focuses on financial inclusion from the perspective of individuals and households, specifically on the identification of socio-economic, institutional, legal, and cultural barriers that prevent individuals from using the formal financial system. Methodologically, my interests are in the application of quantitative methods including multi-level and spatial modelling to determine patterns of exclusion at national and local levels.

    Research supervisors: Dr Malcolm Fairbrother, Dr Sean Fox

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Financial Inclusion Forum Association for Women’s Rights in Development

    Email: e.bermeo@bristol.ac.uk

    Website/Blog: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elizabeth_Bermeo


  • Emily Eyles

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Perceived, self-rated, and objective measures of health by employment status: A comparison of four neighbourhoods in south-west England

    Research supervisors: Professor Clive Sabel, Dr David Manley

    Email: ee15592@bristol.ac.uk


  • Gareth Griffith

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: Modelling of changing mental well being using Understanding Society data and random coefficient models

    Research supervisors: Professor Kelvyn Jones, Dr George Leckie

    Email: g.griffith@bristol.ac.uk


  • Hayley Jayne Lowther

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bath, Department of Psychology

    Start date: October 2018

    Research topic: Characterising neural activation and functional connectivity differences between resilient and non-resilient young people

    My research aims to refine the construct of resilience using computational modelling and identify differences in neural activation and functional connectivity in resilient young people compared to their non-resilient peers. Understanding the mechanisms that enable some individuals to achieve positive outcomes following exposure to adversity or trauma may shed light on how to intervene with individuals who experience psychopathology under these circumstances.

    Research supervisors: Dr Graeme Fairchild , Dr Claire Haworth

    Email: h.j.lowther@bath.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/hayleyjlowther


  • Kalyan Kumar

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bath, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Social and Policy Sciences/Department of Education

    Start date: October 2017

    Research topic: Accountability & Learning Outcomes in School Education System: Examining Cross-Contextual Public Secondary School Education Systems

    Despite the progress made in the last few decades in developing countries, evidence demonstrates a lack of translation of schooling into learning. The role of systemic factors such as accountability processes continues to remain under researched amidst the prevailing challenges. In this backdrop, my research seeks to bridge the knowledge gap by studying, how accountability processes in public secondary school education systems affect the learning outcomes of students from various socio-economic backgrounds? My study employs a systems approach which views school system as a set of or a network of relationships and cumulative practices occurring in a particular format.

    Research supervisors: Dr Andres Sandoval-Hernandez, Dr Liz Washbrook

    Email: kkk44@bath.ac.uk


  • Kiran Arabaghatta Basavaraj

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, Q-Step Centre, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2017

    Research topic: Data Democracy and Policy-Making in the Digital World

    My research focuses on inter-linkages between digital technologies and democracy, and investigates the dynamics of social-media, digital listening, governance and policy-making, with a case of industrial strategy of UK. Current literature indicates increase in information flows has increased transparency, but when it comes to policy making, the betterment of access to information hasn’t resulted in a conversation with the policy makers and the stakeholders. Technologies by itself would not do the trick, but requires set of actors to retrieve the available distributed information (big data) and use it in decision making.

    Research supervisors: Professor Susan Banducci

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Member, Political Studies Association (PSA)

    Email: ka385@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kiran-a-basavaraj-b110b214a/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/kiranabasavaraj


  • Laura Scheinert

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Exeter, College of Life and Environmental Sciences

    Start date: September 2018

    Research topic: Immigration Judges in Europe Before and After the ‘Refugee Crisis’: Assessing the Relationship between Written Judgements, Asylum Laws and Extraneous Influences over Judicial Reasoning Using Text Mining and Advanced Regression Analyses

    Research has shown that judicial reasoning is influenced by more than just the legal specifics of cases. Immigration judges in Europe have faced the unprecedented challenge of determining many thousands of asylum claims in a short space of time following the so-called ‘refugee crisis’ of 2015. My project investigates in detail the changing influences over judicial reasoning before and after 2015 for specific countries and regions in Europe, employing advanced text mining techniques on the corpora of written judgments on asylum cases and relevant laws and regulations governing asylum, and multiple regression analysis to investigate the factors that influence asylum decisions.

    Research supervisors: Professor Nick Gill , Dr Emma Tonkin

    Email: l.scheinert@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurascheinert/


  • Lucy Prior

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Investigating relationships of neighbourhood deprivation, social capital and stress on health and wellbeing

    My research concerns the mechanisms and temporality of the relationships between neighbourhood deprivation, social capital and stress with overall health and wellbeing. My research draws on life-course and biosocial theories and employs advanced quantitative techniques, particularly multilevel modelling and mediation analysis to expose complex health and place relationships. I am using data from the British Household Panel Survey and the Understanding Society study to conduct the research.

    Research supervisors: Dr David Manley, Professor Kelvyn Jones

    Email: lp0841@bristol.ac.uk


  • Nina Zhang

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: A case study of rural migrant workers gendered employment choices in China

    Research supervisors: Dr Winnie Wang, Professor Richard Harris

    Email: nina.zhang@bristol.ac.uk


  • Rhiannon Moore

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences / School of Education

    Start date: September 2017

    Research topic: Exploring the impact of teacher motivation and classroom practices on student learning in India

    My research looks at the relationship between teachers’ levels of professional motivation and student learning attainment within secondary school classrooms in two states in India. The context for this research is the ‘learning crisis’ which existing research has highlighted within Indian schools in recent years, with evidence of a decline in learning levels despite increased enrolment, declining class size and greater teacher availability. I am interested in understanding more about the influence of teachers within this ‘learning crisis’.

     

    Methodologically, my interests are in defining a measure of the latent trait of teacher motivation, and in modelling the pathways through which this influences how teachers teach, and how much students learn.

    Research supervisors: Professor Sally Thomas, Dr George Leckie

    Email: rhiannon.moore.2017@my.bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/Rhi_Moore


  • Satpal Singh Sandhu

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, Centre for Multilevel Modelling, Graduate School of Education

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Analysis of longitudinal craniofacial growth data to examine growth trajectories and pattern, factors influencing their growth, and to develop growth prediction model

    My research involves adaptation and development of Advanced Quantitative Methods for modelling complex longitudinal craniofacial growth data. The objective is to advance understanding of craniofacial growth process (primary focus would be face) from early childhood through to adulthood. My research is based on the data collected from various historic longitudinal growth studies conducted in the 20th Century and presently part of American Association of Foundation Legacy (AAOFL) collection database.

    Research supervisors: Dr George Leckie, Professor Kate Tilling

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Growth Modelling Group, School of Social and Community Medicine and Spatial Modelling Group, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

    Email: satpal.sadhu@bristol.ac.uk


  • Tom Owton

    Advanced Quantitative Methods

    PhD Researcher in Advanced Quantitative Methods (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Social Vulnerability Mapping

    I attempt to develop new methods of mapping natural hazard social vulnerability in developing countries. Where “social vulnerability” refers to the well-established phenomenon that people of certain social groups are more negatively affected by natural hazards. With regards to informal settlements official statistics such as census data are typically lacking and surveys are expensive and difficult to collect. As a result, my research attempts to use sources of data from in particular remote sensing to map social vulnerability, such as brightness at night and information derived from visible light satellite imagery.

    Research supervisors: Dr Sean Fox, Dr Jeffrey Neal

    Email: to12018@bristol.ac.uk