Political Science and International Studies

  • Cameron Hunter

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2013

    Research topic: US Reactions to China’s “Rise in Space”

    Drawing on public and declassified documents, my research tracks the construction of the “Chinese Space Threat” in US policy discourses from 1958 to the present. I particularly focus on China’s so-called “rise in space,” a concept used by American observers to contextualise events since 2000. This has included the launch of China’s first person into space and the demonstration of a series of technologies with the potential to be used as “space weapons.” Using a theoretical approach which combines insights from Critical Security and Science and Technology Studies, my project explores the technopolitics which constitute the official US response to China’s “new” technical capabilities.

    Research supervisors: Professor Yongin Zhang, Dr Columba Peoples

    Professional memberships/Positions held: British Research Council Fellow, Library of Congress (2015), Research Fellow, Schumacher Institute

    Email: ch13595@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/CP_Hunter


  • Ditte Madsen

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Teenage pregnancy and social inclusion in Cornwall

    Research supervisors: Dr Dario Castiglione

    Email: dtm207@exeter.ac.uk


  • Emily Anne Marsay

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies
    University of Exeter, School of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2017

    Research topic: The Quintuple Crisis? Addressing the missing crisis of care in the Alternative Development Strategies for a post-2015 era.

    My research will evaluate the impact of different international development projects which aim to empower women and girls. I will focus on the role of unpaid care work in the achievement of development outcomes, and on the consequences that empowerment projects may have for the provision of care. I will conduct a comparative ethnography that aims to reflect the knowledge and the systems of meaning in the lives of a community in Eastern Kenya. I hope to construct a colourful picture of the myriad factors that contribute to women’s self-perceived empowerment and autonomy, including social interaction, structural constraints, culture and relationships.

     

    Research supervisors: Dr Duncan Russel, Dr Sarah Cooper

    Professional memberships/Positions held: University of Exeter Gender Research Network

    Email: em390@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-marsay-3657a395/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilymarsay


  • Francesca Farmer

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Cybercrime vs hacktivism: do we need a differentiated regulatory approach?

    The thesis aims to delineate and categorise different forms of political hacktivism by researching motivations behind cyber-attacks. It will then investigate whether a specific policy approach should accommodate political hacktivism at the national level. The primary methods used in this study will be qualitative.  Interviews and questionnaires with key stakeholders will be the main data source with anonymous online surveys acting as a secondary data source for harder to reach participants. A virtual ethnography of the hacktivists behaviours on forums will also be undertaken in order to research the motivations behind hacktivism.

    Research supervisors: Professor Alison Harcourt, Professor Oliver James

    Email: ff244@exeter.ac.uk


  • George Boss

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC +3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2017

    Research topic: Developing a Marxian theory of historically-created need, and exploring its significance.

    My research explores the differing conceptions of human need that have emerged from the work of Marx, and in the Marxist canon. By developing a distinctive new perspective on human need, I will be seeking to address problems in the contemporary philosophy of needs, as well as identifying applications.

    Research supervisors: Professor Terrell Carver, Dr Jonathan Floyd

    Email: George.boss@bristol.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/georgeboss/


  • Greg Stride

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2018

    Research topic: Public confidence in the electoral processes of the United Kingdom

    Do people in the UK trust that their elections are free and fair? My research is on public attitudes towards electoral integrity and election administration in the UK. For the MRes thesis I am working on determining the relationship between mandatory Voter ID requirements in polling stations and confidence in the electoral process.

    Research supervisors: Professor Susan Banducci

    Email: gs485@exeter.ac.uk


  • Hannah Willis

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Membership Surges in Political Parties: What does this mean for the party, its members and society?

    Only a small percentage of citizens in advanced industrial democracies are members of a political party; the numbers have largely been declining over the last five decades. Current knowledge tells us that the minority who do join have five dimensions of incentives for doing so, some being more popular than others. Yet, when a party experiences an acute period of expansion in its memberbase, do peoples’ incentives for joining change? Are different kinds of people attracted? How does this affect the party and wider society? Using advanced statistical methods, supplemented with qualitative interviews and content analysis, the project aims to answers these questions.

    Research supervisors: Professor Nicole Bollever

    Email: hw487@exeter.ac.uk


  • Jack O. Griffiths

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2013

    Research topic: The Ontology, Ethics, and Politics of Capability

    I am a PhD candidate based in the Department of Politics. My research lies at the intersection of political thought, ethics, and philosophy of biology, focusing on the relationships between political/ethical thinking and the ways in which we conceive of the living world and the place of humanity within it.

    My current research centres on the concept of capability (à la the ‘capability approach’ of Sen and Nussbaum), as a point through which to critically discuss political concepts such as freedom, power, and individual and social development, and their relations to our understanding of life and nature.

     

    Research supervisors: Dr. Robin Durie, Professor John Dupre

    Email: jg348@exeter.ac.uk


  • Katy Brown

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bath, Department of Politics, Language and International Studies

    Start date: October 2017

    Research topic: Topic Title: From the international to the national: exploring the reasons behind the success of populist and nativist politics in France and the United Kingdom

    With the Brexit referendum result, Donald Trump’s election and Marine Le Pen’s progression to the second round of the French presidential election, right-wing populism has become a key actor in shaping western politics. Such parties claim to protect their nation from the “dangerous” consequences of internationalisation, which are often identified as a loss of sovereignty and excessive, culturally dangerous immigration. My research stems from the desire to gain a deeper understanding of why populist nativist parties have been successful and how the mainstream has responded. Through this process, my project will deliver positive alternative strategies to challenge the prevailing narrative.

    Research supervisors: Dr Aurelien Mondon, Dr Nicholas Startin

    Email: kjb28@bath.ac.uk


  • Kit Waterman

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, College of Social Sciences and International Studies

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: How do structural dependencies effect US strategic leverage in East Asia?

    Research supervisors: Dr Dario Castiglione

    Email: kdw205@exeter.ac.uk


  • Leanne Fuller

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, Politics

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Growing Double and Deutero loop learners: An analysis of the British Army’s efforts to inculcate a learning culture amongst junior officers

    This collaborative study will research to what extent the Defence Organisational Learning Strategy aim of implementing a “routine learning culture” in the British Army has been effective.  Organisational learning culture within a hierarchical/bureaucratic structure will be investigated: identification and examination of poor and best practice in introducing a learning culture within such organisations as well as analysing top-down imposed cultural changes and their implementation and acceptance at the bottom of such structures.   This project should also assist the Army in identifying and developing its own learning practice and enable more effective evaluation of the top-down policy initiatives being implemented.

    Research supervisors: Dr Sergio Catignani, Dr Andrew Massey

    Email: lf316@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/leanne-fuller-7a505664


  • Max Roger Taylor

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bath, Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies

    Start date: September 2014

    Research topic: Seeking common ground: Assessing the practical implementation of the EU’s normative power in EU-China relations

    My thesis seeks to assess the mechanisms used by the EU to practically coordinate and employ its values (or norms) in EU-China diplomatic dialogues. The bilateral relationship represents arguably the hardest test case for the EU’s normative power, due to the tension between the Union’s significant economic interests and its constitutional mandate to uphold its values with this key bilateral partner, that holds different values in many areas.

     

     

    Research supervisors: Professor Charles Lees, Dr Maria Garcia

    Professional memberships/Positions held: Undergraduate Teaching Assistant, Visiting Scholar Renmin University of China, Co-chair University of Bath International Relations and Postgraduate Group (IREP).

    Email: M.R.Taylor@bath.ac.uk


  • Nancy McLennan

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Relations (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2017

    Research topic: Transnational feminist organising: pathways from protest to policy

    My research focuses on the role of transnational feminist movements in the development of transformative policy to end violence against women. An exploration of the methods and means of contemporary praxis will be undertaken using a feminist standpoint approach. An analysis of lived experiences, facilitated by close engagement with the Everywoman Everywhere Coalition, will be interpreted with reference to dominant conceptual frameworks advanced by social movement theorists. My research interests reflect my ten years of professional experience at the UN supporting governments develop participatory policy and my active engagement in women’s movements working to end violence against women.

    Research supervisors: Professor Jutta Weldes, Dr Maud Perrier

    Email: nancy.mclennan@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/NancyMcLennan


  • Nicholas Dickinson

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Exeter, Politics

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: The Regulation of MPs Salaries and Expenses in Westminster Democracies

    I am a doctoral researcher in Politics focusing on the regulation of the salaries and expenses of members of parliament in Westminster democracies. The project aims to provide analysis and information on expenses regulation both from a scholarly standpoint and to inform ongoing debates on policy. My broader interests are the comparative study of parliamentary institutions in the English-speaking world, with a particular focus on the interactions between institutional arrangements, resource use and forms of political behaviour.

     

    Research supervisors: Professor Nicole Bolleyer, Professor Claudio Radaelli

    Email: nd327@exeter.ac.uk

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/nick-dickinson-12782896

    Website/Blog: https://twitter.com/NickSDickinson


  • Rosie Walters

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Political Science and International Studies (ESRC 1+3)
    University of Bristol, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

    Start date: September 2015

    Research topic: Girl Power Discourses in International Development

    My research focuses on prominent campaigns that advocate investing in young women in developing countries and posit girls’ education as the solution to global poverty.

     

    Research supervisors: Professor Jutta Weldes, Dr Karen Tucker

    Email: rosie.walters@bristol.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosie_walters


  • Tristan Hotham

    Political Science and International Studies

    PhD Researcher in Politics (ESRC +3)
    University of Bath, Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies

    Start date: September 2016

    Research topic: Examining the Impact and Effectiveness of Facebook on Party Campaigns

    I am examining the use of Facebook as a political campaign tool by British political parties across three contexts, the 2015 General Election, 2017 General Election and the 2016 Welsh Assembly Elections. Through analysing Facebook data and undertaking interviews, I will evidence how and why Facebook is used, questioning its effectiveness and impact upon parties’ campaigns. Facebook appears to be a vital tool, that as part of a new data led political zeitgeist, within an era of party decline and radicalism, may help or hinder parties to campaign.

    Research supervisors: Dr Nick Startin, Dr David Cutts, Prof. Roger Scully

    Professional memberships/Positions held: PSA Early Career Member POLIS Student Research Rep

    Email: th612@bath.ac.uk

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TristanHotham